Gardasil Weekly Update

Class action against Merck Sharp & Dohme

On a positive note if there is one in this Gardasil story is the news that a class action against the manufacturers of Gardasil began on August 4, 2017 on behalf of 700 Columbian women who in March 2014 were admitted to the hospital suffering new medical conditions after the administration of Gardasil. The Reconstruando Esperanza Association consists of the alleged victims of Gardasil, which is suing  Merck Sharp & Dohme for “the damages caused to the life and health” of hundreds of women and girls.

Some background to this case:

In August 2014, The South China Post  reported: Hundreds of girls in Colombian town sick after taking Gardasil vaccine. While the parents of the girls suspected adverse reactions to the HPV vaccine, there were others such as the National Ministry of Health who called this a case of mass hysteria and even suggested the idea that their illnesses might be as a result of illicit drug use or overuse of the ouija board.

Jeffrey Jaxen reports on the testimonies given by the girls:

Maria Paula Salamanca, was given an injection of Gardasil on May 27, 2013.

A year prior to that, in 2012, Salamanca was a world-class skater winning a silver metal for Colombia in the annual 100K New York Marathon. After the HPV shot, she began to pass out and have migraines that she, her coaches and her family all attributed to fatigue.

Juliana Vega, now 19 years old, was given the HPV shot at school in 2014 yet was never warned about the risks. Fifteen days later she began fainting, and started losing her hair and vision. Vega testified stating:

I had to suspend my plans for college. I was extremely athletic before, now I can’t run — my legs won’t let me. I have no wheelchair and if I awake with no mobility in my legs, I have to stay in bed.

Some practical support for the girls has come from a powerful figure in Columbian politics. Inspector General Alejandro Ordoñez insisted that the girls were given top treatment and asked that the National Institute of Health issue scientific studies of HPV suggesting vaccine safety. Meanwhile the Health department held an inquiry into the outbreak of new medical conditions arising after the second dose of Gardasil and concluded that the girls symptoms were not due to Gardasil rather they were due to episodes of psychogenic cause, due to the minor’s fear of being sick, augmented by the media attention on the events and lack of an identified cause.

It is no wonder the Columbian girls and their families have taken to the courts. Good luck to the 700 young women as they seek justice through the courts for the damages caused to the life and health.

Patrice’s message to other mothers is clearly: ‘Don’t do it.’

This harrowing story told by Patrice about the death of her daughter Gabby was recorded by the Vaxxed team while they toured Australia this week. This is the first death in Australia in relation to Gardasil that I have heard of, but of course it is unlikely to be the only Australian death that has occurred in a girl or boy following HPV vaccination. The Database of Adverse Events Notifications (DAEN) found on the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) website, lists there have been around 4000 adverse events recorded but they list no deaths. But few people are aware of where or how to record their adverse events so the real extent of events following vaccination are likely to be much worse and may include deaths. The recording system VAERS covering USA and some European countries reports that there have been 324 deaths following Gardasil vaccination. Patrice’s daughter Gabby who died several years ago wanted to have the vaccine. Gabby was a normal healthy young girl and she and her friends were very aware of the media hype that preceded the rollout of Gardasil including TV ads urging girls to be ‘one less’ to die from cervical cancer. Gabby’s mother Patrice had a gut instinct that the vaccine wasn’t needed and told her daughter about her concerns regarding its safety but to no avail. After her first Gardasil vaccine Gabby complained of a headache that didn’t go away followed by pain in the right side of her abdomen three weeks after the shot. This was found on ultrasound to be coming from a tumour on her right ovary. Gabby was diagnosed with small cell ovarian cancer. She was given chemotherapy and died an ‘excruciatingly painful death’. Patrice’s message to other mothers is clearly: ‘Don’t do it.’

Multiple sclerosis or vaccine injured?

The average age for a diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis is 30, but in recent years the number of younger women diagnosed with the disease in Australia has risen dramatically. It used to affect men and women equally but now women are three times more likely to be affected. I recently heard of a young woman who was relieved when she was diagnosed with MS because no-one had been able to tell her why she was unwell. Her symptoms began when she was 13 and consisted of headaches, sensory deficit affecting her leg, and fatigue resulting in her missing a lot of school.

I wondered as I heard her story if rather than MS she was suffering a vaccine injury.  Neurological dysfunction is one of the very common adverse events of the Gardasil vaccine. Her symptoms started at 13, the age Gardasil is given to young teens as part of the school vaccination program. It makes me wonder just how many girls and boys are diagnosed with MS and other neurological conditions and autoimmune diseases rather than with a vaccine injury. Naomi Snell, a 28-year-old Melbourne woman suffered autoimmune and neurological problems following her Gardasil vaccination and was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis initially but was later found to be suffering a neurological response to the vaccine. Similarly 26-year-old Kristin Clulow from NSW was given the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis after her health began to unravel after her second shot of Gardasil with the prescribed treatment methylprednisolone, commonly given to sufferers of this debilitating neurological disease. Kristin was eventually given the diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, an immune-mediated inflammatory demyelinating condition that predominately affects the white matter of the brain and spinal cord.

Laura, one of the Irish ‘Gardasil Girls’ was told she was suffering chronic fatigue syndrome after her condition worsened to such an extent she could no longer go to school. But whatever the health system chose to call the debilitating conditions, she and the other affected girls and their families are united in their conviction that they became ill after their HPV vaccinations. Many of these girls and now boys who are unwell after their HPV vaccinations are forced to seek medical help, they need answers. But instead they are given a medical diagnosis that seems to fit while the cause remains hidden.

See: Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Where’s the debate?

What health official in their right mind is willing to anticipate 2,300 serious adverse events to try and prevent 7.9 cases of cervical cancer? asked Norma Erickson, in her article FDA approved Gardasil 9: Malfeasance or Stupidity?

Serious adverse events  are defined as death, life-threatening events, hospitalization, disability or permanent damage. According to information on the Gardasil 9 package insert, for every 100,000 people using Gardasil 9 there would be 2,300 serious adverse events. This is a huge risk to take for a disease that affects 6-8/100,000 women in Australia, or 7.9/100,000 in the United States.

Gardasil 9, said to be protective against infection with HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58 was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in December 2014. It was approved without the usual review process that is usually undertaken by the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. In the clinical trials funded by the manufacturer Merck, a placebo was not used but instead trial participants received either Gardasil 9 or the quadrivalent Gardasil. The package insert reveals that in the case of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine, the original Gardasil, for every 100,000 people receiving the vaccination there would be 2500 serious adverse events – more than is expected for the new Gardasil 9. As we now know thousands of girls and boys are becoming very unwell after their HPV vaccinations. We are seeing this right across the globe after 10-11 years of HPV vaccination. According to Vigibase, the World Health Organisation’s database there are now over 73,000 recorded adverse events after HPV vaccination. And this figure is regarded as not accurate for so many events are not recorded. The correct figure is estimated to be closer to double that number.

The Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) will shortly decide whether Gardasil 9 is to be listed on the Australian National Immunisation Program as a 2 dose schedule for females and males aged 12 -13 years as part of a school age program for the prevention of HPV. This will replace the current 3 dose schedule of the 4 valent HPV, Gardasil vaccine. This is not a good move for Gardasil 9 contains more than twice the amount of aluminium, a neurotoxin, used as an adjuvant to stimulate the production of antibodies. The current HPV vaccine Gardasil has 225 micrograms of aluminium per dose whereas each dose of Gardasil 9 contains 500mcgs. Gardasil 9 also contains more antigens (the HPV LI proteins) with the total number increasing from 120 mcgs to 270 mcgs. Do we know the effect of these changes? How will increased antigens and more aluminium affect the bodies of these young people who are told that they need this vaccination for a disease they are most unlikely to ever get.

Wording is important. The PBAC listing information uses the phrase for the preventi0n of HPV. It may well be the case that these  vaccines do prevent HPV but the question is whether they will ever prevent a single case of cervical cancer. HPV is a common virus, one that is even found in newborns. It is also a virus which is naturally dealt with by the body’s immune system within 2 years. Cervical cancer is a very slow-growing cancer. It is detected during Pap smear testing. There are around 900 cases of the disease in Australia each year and the death rate is around 200.

Surely the public should be given this information? Doctors must understand the risks and explain these to the recipients as part of the process of informed consent. The ill-health and death ensuing from HPV vaccination is likely to worsen with the listing of Gardasil 9 on the National Immunisation Program. Such bad news should form part of our public debate but it isn’t.

See: Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed

 

 

 

Melbourne Launch of Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed by Helen Lobato

To be launched by women’s health researcher Dr Renate Klein

When: Friday June 9

Time: 5 pm for 5.30 pm

Where: Kathleen Syme Library and Community Centre, 251 Faraday St, Carlton, Vic 3053

RSVP: Monday June 5 women@spinifexpress.com.au

 

In Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed Helen Lobato argues that we do not know whether HPV vaccines will decrease the incidence of cervical cancer. What is emerging, however, is evidence of their harmful effects. In 2006, the experimental HPV vaccination program began and there have been at least 315 associated deaths and more than 50,000 adverse events following HPV vaccination.

Gardasil was fast-tracked through the FDA, a process usually reserved for life threatening diseases to fill an unmet and urgent medical need. Improved living conditions had already reduced the incidence of cervical cancer significantly in Western countries. So why is the HPV vaccine so heavily promoted in Australia, a country with one of the lowest rates of cervical cancer in the world?

Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed documents the early history of cervical cancer and tracks its progression from a disease of obscurity to one of mainstream prominence. It includes the stories of vaccinated girls and boys who remain ill after receiving a vaccine purported to prevent a disease they were most unlikely to get. It records the voices of dissenters and resisters who call for an inquiry into HPV vaccines approved for use after a relentless propaganda campaign promoting a vaccine against a virus that many had never heard of.

This in-depth investigation exposes cracks in the pharmaceutical industry and highlights the problems that arise when government regulators and corporate interests are prioritized ahead of patient safety, independent science and common sense.

 

Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed

 

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Forthcoming June Release

In Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed  Helen Lobato argues that we do not know whether HPV vaccines will decrease the incidence of cervical cancer. What is emerging, however, is evidence of their harmful effects. In 2006, the experimental HPV vaccination program began and there have been at least 315 associated deaths and more than 50,000 adverse events following HPV vaccination.

Gardasil was fast-tracked through the FDA, a process usually reserved for life threatening diseases to fill an unmet and urgent medical need. Improved living conditions had already reduced the incidence of cervical cancer significantly in Western countries. So why is the HPV vaccine so heavily promoted in Australia, a country with one of the lowest rates of cervical cancer in the world?

Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed documents the early history of cervical cancer and tracks its progression from a disease of obscurity to one of mainstream prominence. It includes the stories of vaccinated girls and boys who remain ill after receiving a vaccine purported to prevent a disease they were most unlikely to get. It records the voices of dissenters and resisters who call for an inquiry into HPV vaccines approved for use after a relentless propaganda campaign promoting a vaccine against a virus that many had never heard of.

This in-depth investigation exposes cracks in the pharmaceutical industry and highlights the problems that arise when government regulators and corporate interests are prioritized ahead of patient safety, independent science and common sense.

To order: women@spinifexpress.com.au

Breast is best

Like most things in life these days feeding a baby has become very complicated and no doubt really expensive. I took a look at some of these infant formula websites and found that babies are not just being fed infant formula for the first few months of life but they can also have a follow on formula when they are  6-12 months old. Even toddlers who are 1-3 years are being catered for with a new product called toddler milk drink. (more…)

What’s wrong with the new HPV test?

d61b1d866e5f08185db93c1037f4bca6From 2017 testing for the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) will replace Pap smear testing and the age at which women are advised to start screening will be raised to 25. At present women over the age of 18 are advised to get a pap smear every two years to screen for cervical cancer. (more…)

‘Bande de Filles’- Girlhood

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If you think your life is difficult, or that your future lacks promise, well check out Girlhood, a film by Celine Sciamma, released in France as Bande de filles, or Girl Gang.

Many reviewers have written that this film was about female empowerment but I fail to see how they have come to this conclusion. Instead, I think that Girlhood is a stark reminder of the struggle which continues for the needs and rights of women to education and a decent livelihood.

Protagonist Mariame lives in the poor suburbs of Paris in a high-rise apartment with her mother who we rarely see for she is the sole bread-winner; her abusive brother; and her two sisters for whom Mariame provides daily care. Girlhood shows us a view of Paris that we don’t usually see. Life is tough; there are street gangs and drug deals and for Mariame the chance of a better life seems unlikely for at sixteen she is unable to continue with high school due to her low grades. She leaves home knowing that if she stays she faces a life such as the one led by her mother who cleans hotel rooms for a living or married to her boyfriend and bearing his babies. Marianne knows this is not the life she wants.

But there are dangers in the real world and for a time Mariame teams up with a desperate girl gang even stealing for them and funding their entertainment, their drinking and drug taking. And the bleak realities of her life continue to surface as Mariame now known as ‘Vic’ starts selling drugs. Dressed in her small red dress, her short blonde wig and balancing awkwardly on her stillettos, the teenager from the African diaspora is most uncomfortable and at the end of the deals quickly retreats from her sexualised appearance to baggy jeans and sweatshirt – her hair cut short and her breasts bound tight.

Finding a way out of her dilemma is difficult. She has left the employ of the drug dealer and has nowhere left to go. We witness the young teenager seeking solace with her boyfriend but the wise young woman knows this will not work in the long-term. She hesitatingly knocks on the door of her family home but doesn’t go in. This is no solution. At the final scene we see her standing on a balcony contemplating her next move. There is silence, we wonder, and then she struts across the screen. There is some lightness in her final steps and we are left to hope.

Screen shot 2015-09-06 at 2.16.11 PMBefore the screening of Girlhood at the Nova Cinema last week we were shown a preview of a forthcoming film He named me Malala which Chronicles the amazing life thus far of the globally beloved education and children’s rights campaigner Malala Yousafzai. At the age of 15, Malala was famous only in her home region of Swat Valley in Pakistan, where she was an outspoken advocate of education for girls. This all changed when she was attacked by Taliban gunmen, who shot the teenager in the head. Miraculously she survived, and her story reverberated around the world in shock, outrage, and awed wonder at her bravery. Her passion for the rights of girls to education continues and as we saw so clearly evident in Girlhood in the plight of Mariame and her gang, for the young women who don’t have an education and a chance at a decent job, the road ahead and away from poverty and abuse is a really tough one.

 

Wave

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A terrific new novella by Hoa Pham

 

Wave explores the alienation of being an international student in Australia with great pathos and depth, told with Hoa Pham’s characteristic compassion and lyricism.—Alice Pung

(more…)

A Centenary worth celebrating

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While the Centenary of Anzac received blanket media coverage, the three-day conference marking the centenary of the historic 1915 Congress of Women passed largely unnoticed.

(more…)

Why stop at poppies!

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It was common at the start of the 20th century to speak of ‘ Australian Ideals’. What are our values and ideals today? Perhaps those who so generously supported the 5000 Poppy campaign could use their goodwill to help Australia progress rather than feed its militaristic tendencies. And rather than answer the call to knit or crochet a poppy perhaps these resources could be spent on the many social problems of our time. Why stop at poppies! (more…)

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