Before HPV there was common sense

The idea that a virus could cause cervical cancer is a relatively new one. In 1977  German virologist Harald zur Hausen claimed that the human papilloma virus – HPV known for causing warts could also cause cervical cancer. From then on all common sense flew out the window.

Why and how the focus changed from an understanding of cervical cancer as a disease associated with social and environmental conditions  to a cancer caused by a virus is addressed in Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed along with the disastrous ramifications for the health of young girls and boys who, in the wake of a scare campaign, are now injected with HPV vaccines.

In my book I explain why I became interested in this story of cervical cancer which stemmed from my diagnosis of cervical dysplasia in the 1980s. This was around the time that the story about a virus was causing the cancer was making the news. With the rates of cancer skyrocketing in the second half of the 20th century the world was concerned about the causes of cancer and in this case cancer of the cervix.  People wanted answers, they wanted to know the cause. Most of all they wanted a cure.

I often wonder about the ability of the scientific community to have most of the world believing that viruses, and not lifestyle and environmental changes, are the cause of these horrid cancers. But that is what has happened in the case of cervical cancer.

Numerous theories as to the cause(s) of cervical cancer have come and gone over the decades. There were the early nineteenth century physicians who claimed that ‘sexual excesses and immorality’ were involved, for it was thought that the disease was found in larger numbers among poorer, city women than amongst married and financially more secure women living in rural areas (Löwy, 2011, p. 140). Domenico Rigoni-Stern, an Italian surgeon, followed this dubious line of reasoning and claimed that cervical cancer rarely occurred in nuns (p. 140). This theory was later discounted when a study revealed that in fact religious sisters were subject to the disease too, and that, contrary to prevailing opinion, women in long-term relationships also developed cervical cancer. Further research by British physician J.C.W. Lever found that “single women bear a proportion of 5.83 per cent, married women 86.6 per cent, and widows 7.5 per cent,” of cases of cancer of the womb. With the notion that sexual excesses and/or immorality were the cause of the disease discredited, researchers began to suspect that a “chronic irritation” or an underlying inflammatory process could be the missing link. In the case of cancer of the uterus it was proposed that the trauma of childbirth itself could be a risk factor. Such speculation might explain why there was more cervical cancer among women of low socioeconomic status than among women of means. Poorer women tended to have more children, lived harsher lives and possibly received less medical care, as well as missing out on much-needed rest and recovery time after the birth of their children (Löwy, 2011, p. 143).

I believe these early researchers were on the right track when they proposed that social circumstances such as poverty and inequality were in some way implicated in the disease process. British psychologist, author and researcher Susan Quilliam documented these lifestyle factors that might increase the chance of becoming ill with cervical cancer in her 1989 book Positive Smear. Quilliam stressed the importance of a balanced diet and claimed that deficiencies in vitamin C, beta carotene and folic acid were common in women with cervical precancerous cells. Quilliam strongly emphasised the importance of a healthy environment, good hygiene and excellent nutrition as prerequisites for good health and resistance to disease (1989, pp. 96–98). When discussing the causes of cervical cancer, she doesn’t shy away from a conversation about the contraceptive pill and how it has a negative effect on natural immunity as well as a propensity to lessen the body’s ability to use folic acid (p. 99). Regrettably, since Quilliam’s 1989 book, the pendulum has swung back to regarding cervical cancer as a disease associated with sexual activity. HPV is now seen as the main culprit and any discussion that there may be other factors that lead to this disease is silenced in the mainstream media. To the extent that Harald zur Hausen’s claim that HPV was the cause of the disease was welcomed by the scientific community even though other institutions such as the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) were wary and stated: “Although evidence for an association between cervical cancer and sexual activity has been available for over a century, the causal role of a sexually transmitted infectious agent has not yet been proven” (IARC, 1989).

Despite this lack of consensus, in 1989, Professor Ian Frazer and Dr Jian Zhou from the University of Queensland in Australia received funding from CSL Ltd, formerly known as the Commonwealth Serum Laboratories to begin work on a vaccine which “would prevent carcinogenic changes believed to result from HPV infections”.  And what has followed is a disaster for over 73000 girls and boys around the world who have suffered shocking adverse events following their vaccination with HPV vaccines for a disease they are extremely unlikely to ever get.

In the interests of this generation of teenagers about to be vaccinated with these fast-tracked HPV vaccines we need to bring back some commonsense. For that I commend the work of Peter Duesberg and the findings presented in a paper published in Molecular Cytogenetics (2013) of which Peter Duesberg is one of six authors which found that the changes seen in cervical cells are caused by exposure to carcinogens such as cigarette smoke. According to the authors, the pieces of inactive HPV DNA that can be found in cervical cancers are from infections or warts that occurred 20-50 years before the cancer.

Indeed  recent research from Egypt puts the HPV causation into further jeopardy. Thabet et al. found that HPV wasn’t the main cause of pre-invasive and invasive cervical cancer among patients in the Delta Region, Egypt. They report the existence of HPV in 39.5% of premalignant lesions and 33.3% in malignant cervical lesions.

Let’s face it. HPV is a very common wart virus. Over 80 percent of us are affected at some stage in our lives. Most of this infection is cleared by the body within two years. Only around 1 percent of the world’s women develop cervical cancer.

This is a cancer much like others in that it is caused by social conditions and environmental factors and other influences such as ageing.

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A comprehensive evaluation of the overall impact of aluminum on human health is overdue

A decade since the launch of the vaccine a book questions the claim it prevents cancer,’ wrote Carolyn Moynihan as she began her review of my book Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed published in August in MercatorNet. Her review was fair with her concluding paragraph:
Lobato concludes her book with an appeal to the media to do their job and give the public the fuller story about the HPV vaccine. You may not agree with her version of the story at all points, but she has shown Big Media some of the things they could be airing in the interests of informed debate.
A month later MercatorNet has published another piece presenting ‘expert’ evidence given by Professor Silvia Carlos an expert on infectious diseases in the Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health at the University of Navarre, Spain. One of the issues that they discuss with Professor Silvia Carlos concerns the safety of aluminium in the HPV vaccine. It is vital that we understand this issue as Gardasil contains 225 micrograms of amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate per dose. The purpose and mechanism of the aluminium as an adjuvent is explained by Exley, C., Siesjö, P. & Eriksson as owing to the homogeneity and generally weak immunogenicity of recombinant antigens, the inclusion of adjuvants is often necessary for the induction of robust immune responses and effective immunisation. In other words the human papilloma virus-like particles made by DNA recombination technology are not strong enough to bring about an immune response so aluminium which enhances the body’s immune response is added.
Silvia Carlos claims that the amount of aluminium in the vaccines is low and quotes the CDC, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention which says that aluminium has been safely used in vaccines for over 70 years.
However Canadian researchers Lucija Tomljenovic and Christopher Shaw state in their paper Aluminium Adjuvants: Are they safe?  
Despite almost 90 years of widespread use of aluminum adjuvants, medical science’s understanding about their mechanisms of action is still remarkably poor. They state that:

Aluminum is an experimentally demonstrated neurotoxin. Experimental research clearly shows that aluminium adjuvants have a potential to induce serious immunological disorders in humans. In addition: the use of adjuvants in human vaccinations has been linked to adverse effects often classified under Autoimmune (or autoinflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants . Combined with the relatively low cost of hydrated colloidal aluminium salts and their ease of inclusion as effective adjuvants within clinically approved vaccine formulations, the continued use of ABA (aluminium based adjuvants) in human vaccinations is likely to continue. Aluminum adjuvants are also used in vaccines such as hepatitis A, hepatitis B, diphtheria-tetanus-containing vaccines, and Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal vaccines.

Canadian researchers Tomljenovic and Shaw state that unlike dietary aluminium which usually is rapidly cleared from the body, aluminium that is used in vaccines such as Gardasil ‘is designed to provide a long-lasting cellular exposure’. They explain that while the aluminium that is contained in vaccine facilitates an immune response against antigens it can make its way into the central nervous system. ‘It is not really a matter of much debate that aluminium in various forms can be neurotoxic.’

The authors of a study called Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity have found that Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. They report that: Vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. It is vital that we understand the part that vaccines such as Gardasil play in the development of  autoimmune diseases for they are increasing all over the globe and currently affect one in five Americans. In the study the immunologists have reviewed cases of ‘vaccine-induced immunity’ explaining the process as Autoimmune Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants. Adjuvants are added to vaccines in order to stimulate the immune system to produce antibodies but in some people they cause immune reactions and symptoms that manifest as autoimmune disease. The latest HPV vaccine Gardasil 9 contains 500 micrograms of (AAHS) which is given as two or three shots.

The safety of our teenagers is at stake. They are being injected all over the world with Gardasil which has 225 micrograms per dose and in Australia next year will be given Gardasil 9 containing 500 micrograms per dose. Tomljenovic and Shaw call for a comprehensive evaluation of the overall impact of aluminum on human health which they stress is overdue. In the meantime the HPV vaccination programs should be ceased. There is zero scientific evidence that HPV vaccines have been proven to prevent a single case of cervical cancer in any country (Dr Sin Hang Lee).

 

 

 

Why are we replacing the Pap smear with a test for HPV?

Why are we replacing the successful Pap smear program with an HPV test when we don’t know if HPV is the cause of cervical cancer?

Joan Shenton, is a British broadcaster and producer of Sacrificial Virgins:  Not for the greater good.  In Part One of the series, Shenton interviews molecular biologist Professor Peter Duesberg who is also the author of What if HPV does NOT cause cervical cancer?  and asks him whether there is a causal relationship between the human papilloma virus and and cervical cancer. “Absolutely not”, he replied, adding that if HPV is there at all then it is what is known as a passenger virus. “It does nothing…these are fossils of HPV which are still in some cells. They are from an infection decades prior to the cancer.” This is damning and we must ask what on earth we are doing vaccinating girls and boys all over the world with a vaccine protective against a harmless wart virus. But the vaccine is not harmless. On the contrary there are more adverse events following its administration than for all other vaccines.

From the 1960s to 1991, cervical cancer screening was available to women in Australia on an opportunistic basis in that the test was done on the request of the doctor or the woman herself. Then, in 1991, an organised program was set up which in 1995 became the National Cervical Screening Program. Since the Australian National Cervical Screening Program began in 1991, the number of deaths from the disease have halved (Cancer Council Australia, 2017).

In December 2017 the successful two-yearly pap tests for women aged between 18 and 69 will be replaced by a five-yearly HPV test for 25 to 74-year-olds. An  ABC online article explains that HPV screening looks for DNA from the human papillomavirus virus strains that cause the vast majority of cervical cancers. (Or so they say). The mainstream media was all over this new test yesterday. Why? Because according to Karen Canfell, director of the Cancer Research Division at the Cancer Council NSW, HPV screening for cervical cancer had been extensively studied and modelled, and shown to be better than Pap smears and liquid-based cytology. And the end of the year when this new program commences is fast approaching. It is time for promotion. And the media follows suite. They do not ask how these changes might adversely affect women or some women. They do not ask if there might be a problem with over treatment.

I suggest that these changes to the national cervical screening program are highly problematic. Firstly because the test is predicated on the basis that HPV causes cervical cancer. But we do not know that. We are told that cervical cancer is caused by HPV but even if the common human papilloma virus is found in tumour cells it may just be a harmless passenger. The real causes of cervical cancer are most likely socioeconomic and environmental factors such as poverty, nutritional deficiences, smoking, multiparity, prolonged contraceptive use and ageing. This test is for HPV not for cervical cancer. HPV is a very common virus so much so that most of us have had this at some stage in our lives. HPV is likely to be found in cervical cells but as Professor Duesberg has explained if the virus is detected it is a fossil, left over from earlier infection.

Pap smear testing has often been seen as excessive and resulting in cases of over-screening and treatment but this new test amounts to much more of the same. If the HPV test finds that a woman has HPV type 16 or 18, she will be given a colposcopy to look for any pre-cancerous cervical lesions. And if the HPV test finds any of the other high risk strains of HPV, then a Pap test will be ordered to ascertain if a colposcopy is required (Sifferlin, 2014). All of this of course will result in more colposcopies, and a lot of unnecessary worry for women who return a positive HPV test. And a great business opportunity for those in the sickness industry. This includes the vaccine industry – for this is sure to mean more women lining up for HPV vaccines and more adverse events resulting in more sick girls and boys who then need expensive medical care if they are to recover their former health. This policy is disastrous as is the HPV vaccination program which vaccinates teenagers all over the world with a vaccine that at best is preventative against a few strains of the human papilloma virus but does not protect them against cancer. How could it – it is a vaccine against a wart virus, that is all.

With these changes to the screening program there is particular concern for women who test negative for HPV but who have cervical cancer. HPV-negative tumours are present in many types of cervical cancers. Zhao MD and his colleagues report that large-scale studies reveal the existence of HPV-negative cervical cancers present in almost all types of cervical cancers (Zhao MD et al., 2014). According to Bosch et al. (2002), there has been little investigation of older women with cervical cancer, but it is likely that the HPV-negative cancers can be found in this group of women.These HPV-negative women will not have their disease found as early as they would have with a routine Pap smear.  There has been little investigation of older women with cervical cancer but it is likely that the HPV negative cancers can be found in this group of women.

With the arrival of videos such as Sacrificial Virgins:  Not for the greater good  and books such as Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed the HPV causes cervical cancer is being exposed as the shocking sham it is. The vaccination program needs to stop until there is proof that HPV causes cancer and so far there is none. And the mainstream media need to up their game. After all this is what they are being paid for.

 

 

What causes cervical cancer?

 

There are many unanswered questions regarding the current dogma that HPV causes cervical cancer. For example:

Why is it that only one in 10,000 HPV infected women go on to develop cervical cancer and why does this cancer only develop decades after HPV infection?

The human papilloma virus was not always considered the cause of cervical cancer. Christine Kent author of Saving the Whole Woman has pointed out that there is a lack of glycogen in the squamous mucosa of the cervix and vagina in women with cervical cancer. Glycogen is a stored form of glucose which is necessary for the health of these reproductive tissues. Other researchers have looked into dietary reasons that may contribute to cervical cancer such as Susan Quilliam who in her book Positive Smear noted nutritional deficiencies such as a lack of vitamin C, beta carotene and folic acid. Carolyn DeMarco also mentions the role of folic acid describing it as an important cofactor needed by the enzymes that make DNA and one that is often deficient in pill users, that can protect against precancerous changes in the cervix. Demarco adds that low levels of beta-carotene have been associated with cervical dysplasia along with inadequate vitamin B6 and selenium. Carolyn Demarco and Susan Quilliam both discuss the role that prolonged use of the contraceptive pill has on the incidence of cervical cancer. A 1988 update of a study that had been going on in Britain for the last 20 years links the pill with cervical cancer. The incidence of cervical cancer in women who had taken the pill for more than ten years was four times greater than for women who had not. The overall incidence of cancer of the cervix was increased in women who had used the pill.

Then there is the role that smoking plays in the development of the disease with it being a major risk factor and said to account for a two-to four-fold increased incidence of cervical cancer. Reading from the QuitNow website :

Smoking is a cause of cancer of the cervix. Tobacco specific carcinogens (cancer-causing substances) have been found in the cervical mucus of smokers. Smokers and former smokers risk of developing cancer of the cervix is about double that of never smokers.The level of risk remains after taking into account other risk factors for cervical cancer including infection with the human papilloma virus (HPV), a likely factor in most cases. Your risk of developing cervical cancer increases the longer you smoke and the more cigarettes you smoke. Women who smoke are around twice as likely to develop cervical cancer than non- smokers and research has shown that toxins from first-hand and second-hand smoking can be found in cervical tissue. Smoking has been implicated in the causation of cervical cancer since the 1970s.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers the following tips for preventing cervical cancer: Don’t smoke, have regular Pap smears, eat a diet high in fruits and vegetables, use a condom and be monogamous. Seems very sensible to me.  And why don’t we hear this sensible advice rather than the baseless message that HPV vaccines are needed to save your daughter from the ravages of cervical cancer. And look where this advice has got the young teens of the world with over 73000 adverse events post vaccination and hundreds of deaths. This is a disease for which HPV vaccination is not warranted. First attend to these lifestyle causes would be a good way to go.

Read more: Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed

 

Gardasil Weekly Update

Class action against Merck Sharp & Dohme

On a positive note if there is one in this Gardasil story is the news that a class action against the manufacturers of Gardasil began on August 4, 2017 on behalf of 700 Columbian women who in March 2014 were admitted to the hospital suffering new medical conditions after the administration of Gardasil. The Reconstruando Esperanza Association consists of the alleged victims of Gardasil, which is suing  Merck Sharp & Dohme for “the damages caused to the life and health” of hundreds of women and girls.

Some background to this case:

In August 2014, The South China Post  reported: Hundreds of girls in Colombian town sick after taking Gardasil vaccine. While the parents of the girls suspected adverse reactions to the HPV vaccine, there were others such as the National Ministry of Health who called this a case of mass hysteria and even suggested the idea that their illnesses might be as a result of illicit drug use or overuse of the ouija board.

Jeffrey Jaxen reports on the testimonies given by the girls:

Maria Paula Salamanca, was given an injection of Gardasil on May 27, 2013.

A year prior to that, in 2012, Salamanca was a world-class skater winning a silver metal for Colombia in the annual 100K New York Marathon. After the HPV shot, she began to pass out and have migraines that she, her coaches and her family all attributed to fatigue.

Juliana Vega, now 19 years old, was given the HPV shot at school in 2014 yet was never warned about the risks. Fifteen days later she began fainting, and started losing her hair and vision. Vega testified stating:

I had to suspend my plans for college. I was extremely athletic before, now I can’t run — my legs won’t let me. I have no wheelchair and if I awake with no mobility in my legs, I have to stay in bed.

Some practical support for the girls has come from a powerful figure in Columbian politics. Inspector General Alejandro Ordoñez insisted that the girls were given top treatment and asked that the National Institute of Health issue scientific studies of HPV suggesting vaccine safety. Meanwhile the Health department held an inquiry into the outbreak of new medical conditions arising after the second dose of Gardasil and concluded that the girls symptoms were not due to Gardasil rather they were due to episodes of psychogenic cause, due to the minor’s fear of being sick, augmented by the media attention on the events and lack of an identified cause.

It is no wonder the Columbian girls and their families have taken to the courts. Good luck to the 700 young women as they seek justice through the courts for the damages caused to the life and health.

Patrice’s message to other mothers is clearly: ‘Don’t do it.’

This harrowing story told by Patrice about the death of her daughter Gabby was recorded by the Vaxxed team while they toured Australia this week. This is the first death in Australia in relation to Gardasil that I have heard of, but of course it is unlikely to be the only Australian death that has occurred in a girl or boy following HPV vaccination. The Database of Adverse Events Notifications (DAEN) found on the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) website, lists there have been around 4000 adverse events recorded but they list no deaths. But few people are aware of where or how to record their adverse events so the real extent of events following vaccination are likely to be much worse and may include deaths. The recording system VAERS covering USA and some European countries reports that there have been 324 deaths following Gardasil vaccination. Patrice’s daughter Gabby who died several years ago wanted to have the vaccine. Gabby was a normal healthy young girl and she and her friends were very aware of the media hype that preceded the rollout of Gardasil including TV ads urging girls to be ‘one less’ to die from cervical cancer. Gabby’s mother Patrice had a gut instinct that the vaccine wasn’t needed and told her daughter about her concerns regarding its safety but to no avail. After her first Gardasil vaccine Gabby complained of a headache that didn’t go away followed by pain in the right side of her abdomen three weeks after the shot. This was found on ultrasound to be coming from a tumour on her right ovary. Gabby was diagnosed with small cell ovarian cancer. She was given chemotherapy and died an ‘excruciatingly painful death’. Patrice’s message to other mothers is clearly: ‘Don’t do it.’

Multiple sclerosis or vaccine injured?

The average age for a diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis is 30, but in recent years the number of younger women diagnosed with the disease in Australia has risen dramatically. It used to affect men and women equally but now women are three times more likely to be affected. I recently heard of a young woman who was relieved when she was diagnosed with MS because no-one had been able to tell her why she was unwell. Her symptoms began when she was 13 and consisted of headaches, sensory deficit affecting her leg, and fatigue resulting in her missing a lot of school.

I wondered as I heard her story if rather than MS she was suffering a vaccine injury.  Neurological dysfunction is one of the very common adverse events of the Gardasil vaccine. Her symptoms started at 13, the age Gardasil is given to young teens as part of the school vaccination program. It makes me wonder just how many girls and boys are diagnosed with MS and other neurological conditions and autoimmune diseases rather than with a vaccine injury. Naomi Snell, a 28-year-old Melbourne woman suffered autoimmune and neurological problems following her Gardasil vaccination and was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis initially but was later found to be suffering a neurological response to the vaccine. Similarly 26-year-old Kristin Clulow from NSW was given the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis after her health began to unravel after her second shot of Gardasil with the prescribed treatment methylprednisolone, commonly given to sufferers of this debilitating neurological disease. Kristin was eventually given the diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, an immune-mediated inflammatory demyelinating condition that predominately affects the white matter of the brain and spinal cord.

Laura, one of the Irish ‘Gardasil Girls’ was told she was suffering chronic fatigue syndrome after her condition worsened to such an extent she could no longer go to school. But whatever the health system chose to call the debilitating conditions, she and the other affected girls and their families are united in their conviction that they became ill after their HPV vaccinations. Many of these girls and now boys who are unwell after their HPV vaccinations are forced to seek medical help, they need answers. But instead they are given a medical diagnosis that seems to fit while the cause remains hidden.

See: Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Where’s the debate?

What health official in their right mind is willing to anticipate 2,300 serious adverse events to try and prevent 7.9 cases of cervical cancer? asked Norma Erickson, in her article FDA approved Gardasil 9: Malfeasance or Stupidity?

Serious adverse events  are defined as death, life-threatening events, hospitalization, disability or permanent damage. According to information on the Gardasil 9 package insert, for every 100,000 people using Gardasil 9 there would be 2,300 serious adverse events. This is a huge risk to take for a disease that affects 6-8/100,000 women in Australia, or 7.9/100,000 in the United States.

Gardasil 9, said to be protective against infection with HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58 was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in December 2014. It was approved without the usual review process that is usually undertaken by the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. In the clinical trials funded by the manufacturer Merck, a placebo was not used but instead trial participants received either Gardasil 9 or the quadrivalent Gardasil. The package insert reveals that in the case of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine, the original Gardasil, for every 100,000 people receiving the vaccination there would be 2500 serious adverse events – more than is expected for the new Gardasil 9. As we now know thousands of girls and boys are becoming very unwell after their HPV vaccinations. We are seeing this right across the globe after 10-11 years of HPV vaccination. According to Vigibase, the World Health Organisation’s database there are now over 73,000 recorded adverse events after HPV vaccination. And this figure is regarded as not accurate for so many events are not recorded. The correct figure is estimated to be closer to double that number.

The Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) will shortly decide whether Gardasil 9 is to be listed on the Australian National Immunisation Program as a 2 dose schedule for females and males aged 12 -13 years as part of a school age program for the prevention of HPV. This will replace the current 3 dose schedule of the 4 valent HPV, Gardasil vaccine. This is not a good move for Gardasil 9 contains more than twice the amount of aluminium, a neurotoxin, used as an adjuvant to stimulate the production of antibodies. The current HPV vaccine Gardasil has 225 micrograms of aluminium per dose whereas each dose of Gardasil 9 contains 500mcgs. Gardasil 9 also contains more antigens (the HPV LI proteins) with the total number increasing from 120 mcgs to 270 mcgs. Do we know the effect of these changes? How will increased antigens and more aluminium affect the bodies of these young people who are told that they need this vaccination for a disease they are most unlikely to ever get.

Wording is important. The PBAC listing information uses the phrase for the preventi0n of HPV. It may well be the case that these  vaccines do prevent HPV but the question is whether they will ever prevent a single case of cervical cancer. HPV is a common virus, one that is even found in newborns. It is also a virus which is naturally dealt with by the body’s immune system within 2 years. Cervical cancer is a very slow-growing cancer. It is detected during Pap smear testing. There are around 900 cases of the disease in Australia each year and the death rate is around 200.

Surely the public should be given this information? Doctors must understand the risks and explain these to the recipients as part of the process of informed consent. The ill-health and death ensuing from HPV vaccination is likely to worsen with the listing of Gardasil 9 on the National Immunisation Program. Such bad news should form part of our public debate but it isn’t.

See: Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed

 

 

 

Melbourne Launch of Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed by Helen Lobato

To be launched by women’s health researcher Dr Renate Klein

When: Friday June 9

Time: 5 pm for 5.30 pm

Where: Kathleen Syme Library and Community Centre, 251 Faraday St, Carlton, Vic 3053

RSVP: Monday June 5 women@spinifexpress.com.au

 

In Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed Helen Lobato argues that we do not know whether HPV vaccines will decrease the incidence of cervical cancer. What is emerging, however, is evidence of their harmful effects. In 2006, the experimental HPV vaccination program began and there have been at least 315 associated deaths and more than 50,000 adverse events following HPV vaccination.

Gardasil was fast-tracked through the FDA, a process usually reserved for life threatening diseases to fill an unmet and urgent medical need. Improved living conditions had already reduced the incidence of cervical cancer significantly in Western countries. So why is the HPV vaccine so heavily promoted in Australia, a country with one of the lowest rates of cervical cancer in the world?

Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed documents the early history of cervical cancer and tracks its progression from a disease of obscurity to one of mainstream prominence. It includes the stories of vaccinated girls and boys who remain ill after receiving a vaccine purported to prevent a disease they were most unlikely to get. It records the voices of dissenters and resisters who call for an inquiry into HPV vaccines approved for use after a relentless propaganda campaign promoting a vaccine against a virus that many had never heard of.

This in-depth investigation exposes cracks in the pharmaceutical industry and highlights the problems that arise when government regulators and corporate interests are prioritized ahead of patient safety, independent science and common sense.

 

Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed

 

high res

Forthcoming June Release

In Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed  Helen Lobato argues that we do not know whether HPV vaccines will decrease the incidence of cervical cancer. What is emerging, however, is evidence of their harmful effects. In 2006, the experimental HPV vaccination program began and there have been at least 315 associated deaths and more than 50,000 adverse events following HPV vaccination.

Gardasil was fast-tracked through the FDA, a process usually reserved for life threatening diseases to fill an unmet and urgent medical need. Improved living conditions had already reduced the incidence of cervical cancer significantly in Western countries. So why is the HPV vaccine so heavily promoted in Australia, a country with one of the lowest rates of cervical cancer in the world?

Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed documents the early history of cervical cancer and tracks its progression from a disease of obscurity to one of mainstream prominence. It includes the stories of vaccinated girls and boys who remain ill after receiving a vaccine purported to prevent a disease they were most unlikely to get. It records the voices of dissenters and resisters who call for an inquiry into HPV vaccines approved for use after a relentless propaganda campaign promoting a vaccine against a virus that many had never heard of.

This in-depth investigation exposes cracks in the pharmaceutical industry and highlights the problems that arise when government regulators and corporate interests are prioritized ahead of patient safety, independent science and common sense.

To order: women@spinifexpress.com.au

Breast is best

Like most things in life these days feeding a baby has become very complicated and no doubt really expensive. I took a look at some of these infant formula websites and found that babies are not just being fed infant formula for the first few months of life but they can also have a follow on formula when they are  6-12 months old. Even toddlers who are 1-3 years are being catered for with a new product called toddler milk drink. (more…)

What’s wrong with the new HPV test?

d61b1d866e5f08185db93c1037f4bca6From 2017 testing for the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) will replace Pap smear testing and the age at which women are advised to start screening will be raised to 25. At present women over the age of 18 are advised to get a pap smear every two years to screen for cervical cancer. (more…)

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