Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed

 

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Forthcoming June Release

In Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed  Helen Lobato argues that we do not know whether HPV vaccines will decrease the incidence of cervical cancer. What is emerging, however, is evidence of their harmful effects. In 2006, the experimental HPV vaccination program began and there have been at least 315 associated deaths and more than 50,000 adverse events following HPV vaccination.

Gardasil was fast-tracked through the FDA, a process usually reserved for life threatening diseases to fill an unmet and urgent medical need. Improved living conditions had already reduced the incidence of cervical cancer significantly in Western countries. So why is the HPV vaccine so heavily promoted in Australia, a country with one of the lowest rates of cervical cancer in the world?

Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed documents the early history of cervical cancer and tracks its progression from a disease of obscurity to one of mainstream prominence. It includes the stories of vaccinated girls and boys who remain ill after receiving a vaccine purported to prevent a disease they were most unlikely to get. It records the voices of dissenters and resisters who call for an inquiry into HPV vaccines approved for use after a relentless propaganda campaign promoting a vaccine against a virus that many had never heard of.

This in-depth investigation exposes cracks in the pharmaceutical industry and highlights the problems that arise when government regulators and corporate interests are prioritized ahead of patient safety, independent science and common sense.

To order: women@spinifexpress.com.au

This scientific debate cannot be ignored – too many lives are at stake

 

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The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Causes Cervical Cancer Hypothesis states that HPV encodes proteins which cause cancers as the virus replicates.

However this hypothesis raises many questions (more…)

What’s wrong with the new HPV test?

d61b1d866e5f08185db93c1037f4bca6From 2017 testing for the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) will replace Pap smear testing and the age at which women are advised to start screening will be raised to 25. At present women over the age of 18 are advised to get a pap smear every two years to screen for cervical cancer. (more…)

A new HPV vaccine is approved amid global concerns over Gardasil

 

Screen shot 2014-12-28 at 7.38.33 PMThe FDA has approved a new Human Papilloma Vaccine covering 9 strains of HPV. The approval of this vaccine, to be marketed as Gardasil 9 is of great concern for it has double the amount of the aluminium adjuvant – a neurotoxin – as Gardasil. (more…)

Why the recommended HPV test is not good for women

 

Screen shot 2014-05-02 at 8.17.43 PMThe Medical Services Advisory Committee has recommended a new test for human papillomavirus, or HPV, to replace Pap smears from 2016. Women would have their first screening for cervical cancer at 25 and would be tested only every five years. (more…)

Viruses – how afraid should we be?

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As I began to write about the marketing of the HPV vaccine Gardasil, I remembered that I had a book on my shelves called Fear of the Invisible written by Janine Roberts in which she asks if we should be afraid of viruses and vaccines. (more…)

Japan has cautioned on Gardasil – shame about Australia

Picture 12 On June 14, the Japanese Health Ministry issued a nationwide notice that the  so-called ‘cervical cancer’ vaccinations should not be recommended for girls aged 12 to 16. This precautionary move followed reports of 1,968 cases of possible adverse effects including body pain, numbness and paralysis. (more…)

Just another case of medical misogyny

New research shows that since the cervical cancer vaccine has been introduced there has been a 90% drop in young women with genital warts caused by the Human Papilloma virus. Researchers claim that over the next few decades there will be similar reduction in rates of cervical cancer. However it has never been proven that the HPV vaccine prevents cervical cancer. There is no scientific evidence of any kind. (more…)

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